The Green Wolf

My ask box is open. I answer most questions privately, unless it's something that other people may be wondering about AND it's not something personal about the person asking. Feel free to ask me stuff about nature, working with animal parts in art and spirituality, paganism, ethical omnivory, sustainability and environmentalism, and so forth.

Be aware that this Tumblr frequently includes pictures of art made with animal remains, as well as occasional left-leaning political ideologies. Mostly it's nature photography and art (and not just of charismatic megafauna).

Artist, author, naturalist pagan, and wannabe polymath living in the Pacific Northwe(s)t.


I discovered neopaganism in the mid-1990s, and shortly thereafter began my work with animal totems and neoshamanism. Over the years I've wandered through various paths, ranging from Wicca-flavored neopaganism to Chaos magic, and for several few years I created (and followed) Therioshamanism, a post-industrial neo-shamanic path. These days I've relaxed into a more integrated ecopaganism, less about rituals and journeying, and more about the sacred in every moment.

I've also been creating various neopagan ritual tools and other sacred art from hides, bones, beads and other such things since about the same time. And I've written several nonfiction books on totemism, animal magic, and related topics. My newest book is "Plant and Fungus Totems: Connect With Spirits of Field, Forest and Garden"..

A few places to find me, as I'm all over the internet:


http://www.thegreenwolf.com
http://thegreenwolf.etsy.com
https://www.facebook.com/TheGreenWolfLupa
www.patheos.com/blogs/pathsthroughtheforests/
http://www.patreon.com/user?u=224084
I’m busy getting everything ready for marrow, moss, my solo art show that’s opening this Saturday evening at Custom Cranium in Eugene, OR! This is the artist’s statement/bio that will accompany the show; I’ve printed it and framed it in a vintage wooden frame I found at a thrift shop. Here’s the text: 
marrow, moss: New Works by Lupa
The American ideal is one of a sanitized, neat world. It’s made of germ-free surfaces and cleanly wrapped cuts of meat, carefully pruned flowering plants and adorable house pets. And it’s entirely artificial.
 Through my work, I reintroduce the viewer to the earthy, organic—and frankly dirty—reality we live in. I close the distance between us and the many living beings we kill every day for food, shelter, medicine, and pleasure. Animals, plants, fungi and minerals blend with human-made detritus, endlessly entangled in these microcosmic pieces as they are in the world at large.
 Most importantly, marrow, moss asks us: what is natural? Even the plastic netting and toys incorporated into some of the pieces derived from oil, itself the remains of millions of tiny prehistoric sea creatures long since gone extinct. We can’t escape nature—we are nature—we feel it in the marrow of our own bones, and the moss that persists in every damp corner of our cities, no matter how modern and new.
 About the Artist
 You know that kid who spent all her free time outdoors, turning over rocks, catching garter snakes, and learning the names of the trees? I’m that kid, all grown up. I currently reside in Portland, Oregon, though I am frequently found in the wilderness areas infusing and surrounding the metro area. I also garden, create kitchen alchemy (also known as “cooking”), and read as much as I’m able to make time for. My website is http://www.thegreenwolf.com

I’m busy getting everything ready for marrow, moss, my solo art show that’s opening this Saturday evening at Custom Cranium in Eugene, OR! This is the artist’s statement/bio that will accompany the show; I’ve printed it and framed it in a vintage wooden frame I found at a thrift shop. Here’s the text: 

marrow, moss: New Works by Lupa

The American ideal is one of a sanitized, neat world. It’s made of germ-free surfaces and cleanly wrapped cuts of meat, carefully pruned flowering plants and adorable house pets. And it’s entirely artificial.

 Through my work, I reintroduce the viewer to the earthy, organic—and frankly dirty—reality we live in. I close the distance between us and the many living beings we kill every day for food, shelter, medicine, and pleasure. Animals, plants, fungi and minerals blend with human-made detritus, endlessly entangled in these microcosmic pieces as they are in the world at large.

 Most importantly, marrow, moss asks us: what is natural? Even the plastic netting and toys incorporated into some of the pieces derived from oil, itself the remains of millions of tiny prehistoric sea creatures long since gone extinct. We can’t escape nature—we are nature—we feel it in the marrow of our own bones, and the moss that persists in every damp corner of our cities, no matter how modern and new.

 About the Artist

 You know that kid who spent all her free time outdoors, turning over rocks, catching garter snakes, and learning the names of the trees? I’m that kid, all grown up. I currently reside in Portland, Oregon, though I am frequently found in the wilderness areas infusing and surrounding the metro area. I also garden, create kitchen alchemy (also known as “cooking”), and read as much as I’m able to make time for. My website is http://www.thegreenwolf.com

And so the bumper crop of potatoes begins!

And so the bumper crop of potatoes begins!

In the Wake of Martha’s Passing - by Lupa Greenwolf

One hundred years ago today [Sept. 1], a small, lonesome little bird passed away at the Cincinnati Zoo. A few decades before this would have been a death of no note; there had been millions of her sort darkening the skies in impossibly large flocks. But on September 1, 1914, Martha, the very last passenger pigeon, died quietly in her cage.

How did a species that was so numerous less than fifty years before just disappear from the face of the planet? Two factors seem to have been the culprits: habitat loss from human expansion, and overhunting for passenger pigeon meat sold commercially. Indeed, these malignant twin forces have caused the endangerment and extinction of countless species over the centuries as human population has exploded, and the demand for land and other resources has grown accordingly.

Birds in the Victorian era faced an additional threat: demand for their feathers. Feathered hats had become exceedingly popular; individual plumes, whole wings, and even entire bird skins were slapped onto millinery confections and sold at a profit. The plume trade became a goldmine, and a feather hunter could retire on the skins of a few particular species. Some species suffered more than others; the great egret almost went extinct because they only grew their magnificent (and much-desired) plumage during the breeding season. Killing an egret almost certainly meant the death of its young, since both parents were needed to incubate the eggs and care for the young once hatched, and this had a predictably detrimental effect on their ability to recover from the impact of rigorous hunting.

Yet we still have egrets today; populations have rebounded, and they’re listed as of “least concern” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Why?

Read the rest here at Paths Through the Forests.

In the Wake of Martha’s Passing - by Lupa Greenwolf

One hundred years ago today [Sept. 1], a small, lonesome little bird passed away at the Cincinnati Zoo. A few decades before this would have been a death of no note; there had been millions of her sort darkening the skies in impossibly large flocks. But on September 1, 1914, Martha, the very last passenger pigeon, died quietly in her cage.

How did a species that was so numerous less than fifty years before just disappear from the face of the planet? Two factors seem to have been the culprits: habitat loss from human expansion, and overhunting for passenger pigeon meat sold commercially. Indeed, these malignant twin forces have caused the endangerment and extinction of countless species over the centuries as human population has exploded, and the demand for land and other resources has grown accordingly.

Birds in the Victorian era faced an additional threat: demand for their feathers. Feathered hats had become exceedingly popular; individual plumes, whole wings, and even entire bird skins were slapped onto millinery confections and sold at a profit. The plume trade became a goldmine, and a feather hunter could retire on the skins of a few particular species. Some species suffered more than others; the great egret almost went extinct because they only grew their magnificent (and much-desired) plumage during the breeding season. Killing an egret almost certainly meant the death of its young, since both parents were needed to incubate the eggs and care for the young once hatched, and this had a predictably detrimental effect on their ability to recover from the impact of rigorous hunting.

Yet we still have egrets today; populations have rebounded, and they’re listed as of “least concern” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Why?

Read the rest here at Paths Through the Forests.

notactuallycute:

mangomamita:

also this is my favorite vine

This video actually isn’t very funny or cute, the dog is visibly stressed. In this instance rolling over is an appeasement signal, she’s trying to convey the message “I’m no threat! don’t hurt me!” This is evident by the numerous other stress behaviors she’s expressing, such as lip licking, ears back,and squinting. 

(via elisabluh)

Did you happen to find the critter hiding in this past weekend’s Look & Find at Paths Through the Forests? Tell us here!

Did you happen to find the critter hiding in this past weekend’s Look & Find at Paths Through the Forests? Tell us here!